Mineral Packed Watercress

Nutrients, Remedies And Benefits Of Watercress

Watercress is rich in essential nutrients and its value has been known since the earliest times. The Romans recommended it to be eaten with vinegar, and thought it particularly suitable for deranged people.

 

Although it is a little plant with small, dark and glossy leaves, the watercress is packed with many minerals like copper, manganese, magnesium, sodium, potassium and calcium. 100 grams of watercress contain 2.6 g protein, 200 mg calcium, 51 mg phosphorus, 1.6 mg iron, 26 mg sodium, 122 mg potassium, 1575 mcg carotene, 0.11 mg vitamin B1, 0.19 mg vitamin B2, 0.3 mg niacin and 84 mg vitamin C.

 

These minerals play an important part in the body's functions. For instance, copper is needed for the production and survival of red blood cells. Manganese helps to nourish our pituitary glands at the base of the brain. Magnesium is an essential constituent of the body and is needed in the process by which energy is produced. To maintain a proper balance in body fluids, sodium and potassium are needed. Calcium is necessary for strong bones and teeth.

 

Watercress is also a good source of blood forming iron. Also it has a high sulphur- which gives the vegetable its unique spicy, peppery flavor. Sulphur is needed in the manufacture of certain amino acids or the building blocks of protein.

 

Another vital mineral found is iodine which is important for the proper functioning of the thyroid gland which produces hormones to regulate growth.

 

As for vitamins, watercress is a good source of vitamin C, a fact long known, since under the name of "scurvy grass" it was given to sailors on long voyages when fresh fruits and vegetables were scarce. Scurvy is a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C.

 

Good quantities of vitamins A, B and E are also found in this vegetable. leafy vegetables usually don't have much protein. Yet watercress has an impressive level at 0.8 gram per ounce of vegetable.